What To Look Out For When Buying A Dachshund Puppy

Dachshund buying a puppy from a breeder

Are you looking to buy a Dachshund puppy but don’t know where to start? Are you trying to figure out the difference between good and bad Dachshund breeders? Here’s what to look out for when buying a Dachshund puppy!

What to look out for when buying a new Dachshund puppy:

  1. Don’t buy Dachshunds in ‘rare’ or ‘unique’ colours
  2. Check breeder details online or on the Kennel Club site
  3. Double-check everything you’re told by the breeder
  4. Don’t agree to meet the breeder in a different location
  5. Make sure you see the puppy with their mother in person
  6. Check the Dachshund puppy looks clean and healthy
  7. Check all relevant health tests have been done
  8. Don’t pay a deposit until you’re 100% sure the breeder is genuine
  9. Don’t collect your puppy until they’re at least 8 weeks old
  10. Make sure all your questions are answered by the breeder
  11. Check all paperwork you’re given by the breeder

But before you start searching for a Dachshund to join your family, there’s more you need to know. Read on to find out how to spot the signs of a good Dachshund breeder, how to avoid bad breeders, what paperwork to expect and what questions you need to ask.

This article is based on research and personal experience as a Dachshund owner of 10+ years. I’m not a Vet, qualified dog trainer or dog behaviourist.


Where Do You Find A Dachshund Puppy?

This is how to find a Dachshund puppy:

  • Find A Dachshund Though The Kennel Club
  • Find A Dachshund Though Recommendations
  • Find A Dachshund Online
  • Adopt A Dachshund Through A Dog Shelter

This is what you need to know:

Find A Dachshund Though The Kennel Club

The best place to find a good, ethical Dachshund breeder is through the Kennel Club Assured Breeder Scheme.

The Kennel Club will visit the breeder to make sure they’re following their strict breeding rules and looking after the Dachshunds properly.

All you need to do is go online, visit the Kennel Club and search for your nearest Kennel Club Assured Dachshund breeder.

Even though there are never any guarantees, buying from a Kennel Club Assured breeder gives you a better chance of getting a healthy puppy with less behavioural issues.

Find A Dachshund Though Recommendations

Another great way to find a reputable Dachshund breeder is to ask around for recommendations. When a breeder has a good reputation, they get most of their business through word of mouth.

You’ll very rarely find a reputable breeder advertising their Dachshunds, because they simply don’t have to!

They only breed a small number of puppies each year and always have people waiting to give them good homes. They do this by building a solid reputation amongst the Dachshund community.

You could ask for recommendations from Dachshund-owning friends and family you know, or if there’s a local Dachshund Facebook group then that’s also a good place to start.

Find A Dachshund Online

There will always be Dachshund puppies advertised online. The problem is, it’s extremely hard to tell the good breeders from the bad.

Good breeders (and even some Kennel Club Assured breeders) do advertise online. However, there’s also a high chance the breeder won’t be reputable and the puppy won’t have been bred in ethical, high-welfare conditions.

That’s why you MUST do your research and check everything you’re told. Adverts can look very convincing but there are a lot of criminals and deceitful people out there.

Adopt A Dachshund Through A Dog Shelter

You don’t have to buy a puppy, you could adopt a Dachshund through a dog shelter.

There are so many Dachshunds looking for new family homes. Maybe their owner passed away or family circumstances changed and they sadly couldn’t be looked after any more.

So ask at your local dog shelter or put your name down on the waiting list. Adoption is a really great option that can be so rewarding for both the Dachshund and the family they join.

It’ll be harder to adopt in the UK and Australia as there are very few Dachshunds available. However, in the US, there are many Dachshunds that are looking to be re-homed with new loving families.

How Do You Find A Good Dachshund Breeder?

When you’re ready to buy a Dachshund puppy, the first step is to find a good, reputable breeder. 

This is a breeder that’s knowledgeable about Dachshunds and only breeds a small number of healthy puppies each year.

Good breeders care about the health and welfare of their Dachshunds, as opposed to volume and profit.

Signs Of A Good Dachshund Breeder

  1. You heard about the Dachshund breeder through word of mouth
  2. The Dachshund breeder is part of a Kennel Club Breeder Scheme
  3. The Dachshund breeder has Kennel Club registered the puppies (they don’t have to be KC registered but it’s safer to buy one that is)
  4. The Dachshund breeder has a waiting list (this isn’t essential, but it’s a good sign as it shows they’re not just churning out puppies!)
  5. The Dachshund breeder only has occasional litters (most reputable breeders will only have a litter available once or twice a year)
  6. The Dachshund breeder wants to vet you (this shows they care about where their puppies go and are making sure they find the right homes for them)
  7. The Dachshund breeder is happy to answer all of your questions and wants to build a relationship with you
  8. The Dachshund breeder doesn’t ask you for a deposit before they’ve met you
  9. The Dachshund breeder encourages you to visit them to meet the puppy and their mother
  10. The Dachshund breeder is happy for you to look around and spend time with the puppy
  11. The Dachshund breeder has a clean home and area for the puppy to play and sleep
  12. The Dachshund puppy is with their mum and siblings, and they’re all interacting well
  13. The Dachshund puppy is clean
  14. The Dachshund puppy looks to be a good healthy weight
  15. The Dachshund puppy is happy for you to play with them
  16. The Dachshund breeder won’t allow you take the puppy home until they’re at least 8 weeks old
  17. The Dachshund breeder gives you some puppy food and feeding guidance
  18. The Dachshund breeder has insured the puppy for a few weeks until you sort out your own pet insurance
  19. The Dachshund breeder has microchipped the puppy (required by law in the UK!)
  20. The Dachshund breeder has done all the relevant health tests
  21. The Dachshund breeder discusses vaccinations with you and explains what you need to do next
  22. The Dachshund breeder gives you all the paperwork you expect and talks you through it
  23. The Dachshund breeder offers you support with your puppy, or gives you information sheets and leaflets on how to care for them properly

If the Dachshund puppy is Kennel Club registered, ask the breeder to give you their registration details (and check they come up when you enter them on the Kennel Club website).

If you don’t buy a Kennel Club registered Dachshund, that’s OK, but it does leave you with a lot more unknowns and risks.

This means you’ll have to do a lot more research on the Dachshund breeder to be sure they’re genuine and the puppy is healthy.

Puppy Dachshund siblings sleeping together
Puppy Dachshund siblings sleeping together

What Are The Signs Of A Bad Dachshund Breeder?

There are some clear and obvious red flags that you should look out for when buying a Dachshund puppy.

You might spot these signs when you’re first researching Dachshund puppies to buy. They might also come up when you’re talking to the breeder or when you go to visit the puppy in person.

Signs Of A Bad Dachshund Breeder

  1. The Dachshund breeder is advertising puppies with ‘rare’ or ‘unique’ coats (a reputable breeder would never do this because they know ‘rare’ Dachshunds are often sickly dogs)
  2. The Dachshund breeder is advertising puppies in toy or teacup sizes (these don’t exist and are usually the runts of the litter)
  3. There are obvious spelling mistakes in email correspondence or adverts, especially with the breed name ‘Dachshund
  4. The Dachshund puppies are being sold in a pet store
  5. The Dachshund breeder has multiple ‘popular’ dog breeds for sale (while some reputable breeders do specialise in several breeds, be wary of those advertising multiple commercially popular breeds online)
  6. The Dachshund breeder doesn’t vet you or ask any questions
  7. The Dachshund breeder wants a big non-refundable deposit before you’ve even seen the puppy
  8. The Dachshund breeder seems overly focused on money and is pushing you to transfer funds
  9. The Dachshund breeder always has puppies available
  10. The Dachshund breeder is selling the puppy under 8 weeks of age (no responsible breeder would ever do this)
  11. The Dachshund breeder doesn’t seem open to talking with you or answering your questions
  12. The Dachshund breeder won’t let you visit the puppy before you buy
  13. The Dachshund breeder tells you they live hundreds of miles away and makes excuses about why you can’t visit
  14. The Dachshund breeder sends photos or videos but won’t do a ‘live’ feed through FaceTime or Zoom (photos and videos can sadly be faked or taken off the internet)
  15. The Dachshund breeder wants to meet you somewhere random to hand over the puppy
  16. The Dachshund breeder won’t let you see the puppy’s mum
  17. The Dachshund breeder won’t let you look at where the puppy plays, eats and sleeps
  18. The Dachshund puppy is not microchipped
  19. The Dachshund puppy looks dirty
  20. The Dachshund puppy looks unhealthy
  21. The Dachshund puppy is coughing, has diarrhoea, or runny eyes and nose
  22. The Dachshund puppy looks underweight or pot-bellied
  23. The Dachshund puppy seems overly nervous around you
  24. The Dachshund breeder’s general living conditions are unclean
  25. The Dachshund puppy isn’t playing or interacting with their siblings
  26. The Dachshund breeder hasn’t done any health tests on the puppy and has no idea what you’re talking about
  27. The Dachshund breeder doesn’t give you any advice leaflets and doesn’t mention feeding guidelines or vaccinations
  28. The Dachshund breeder doesn’t give you any paperwork when you collect the puppy
  29. The Dachshund breeder gives you a puppy passport (this means the puppy has been imported from abroad and likely from a puppy farm)
  30. The price of the Dachshund puppy seems unusual (either way below or way above average)

There are so many bad breeders and criminals out there, so do your research and double-check everything you’re told.

Getting it wrong could mean your puppy has health or behavioural issues, which could leave you heartbroken and out of pocket.

So, if at any point your gut feeling tells you something is off, walk away. Don’t go ahead to try and ‘save’ the puppy as this just fuels the trade.

Dachshund puppies with their mom
Dachshund puppies with their mom

How To Research Your Dachshund Breeder?

When you’ve found a Dachshund breeder, you need to research them to make sure they’re credible.

  1. Find out more about the Dachshund breeder
  2. Google the Dachshund breeder and look for reviews
  3. Double-check everything you’re told by the breeder
  4. Look and listen for signs of good and bad breeding
  5. Visit the Dachshund breeder at their property

This is what you need to know:

Find out more about the Dachshund breeder

It’s a good idea to find out whether the Dachshund breeder is licensed or part of a Kennel Club breeder scheme. You should be able to check this by entering the breeder’s name on your local Kennel Club website.

If they’re listed as a Breeder of Merit or a member of the Bred with H.E.A.R.T. programme, even better!

Kennel Club breeders are committed to following a Code of Ethics and are knowledgeable about what is and isn’t acceptable when breeding Dachshunds.

Even though the breeder doesn’t have to be part of a Kennel Club scheme, it’s better if they are. Simply because it rules out some of the uncertainty over buying a Dachshund puppy.

Google the Dachshund breeder and look for comments and reviews

It’s always good to Google the Dachshund breeder and check for any comments or reviews online. This may give you a sense of whether people were happy with the Dachshund puppy they purchased from that breeder.

Just keep in mind that online reviews are quite easy to fake or manipulate, so don’t rely entirely on this for your research.

You may find out other information about the breeder too, so it’s worth doing some searches to see what comes up. Check the breeder’s address and any other information you’re given to be sure it all looks genuine.

Double-check everything you’re told by the breeder

The breeder may send you photos or videos of the puppies they have available. However, just bear in mind that these can all be faked.

Some unscrupulous breeders even set up credible-looking websites, but they’re easy to fake too and you just can’t trust them.

So, whatever the breeder says, make sure it all checks out. If they say the puppy is KC registered, be sure to look up the registration number online.

Don’t hand over a deposit until you’ve seen the puppy in person and are 100% convinced the breeder is genuine.

Look and listen for signs of good and bad breeding

The Dachshund breeder might not even have any puppies available at this time, but they may suggest putting you on a waiting list.

This is a good sign that the breeder is only breeding small numbers of puppies and is taking care over where each one goes.

There are lots of good signs and red flags to look out for. So use the list earlier in this article to learn how to spot and avoid the bad breeders!

Visit the breeder at their property

The next step is to arrange to visit the breeder at the address where the puppies are bred.

Reputable Dachshund breeders will encourage you to come and visit the puppy in person so you can both ask each other your questions.

This is your chance to make sure the breeder is ethical and credible.

However, if things seem off or you get a bad feeling when you’re there, it may be best to walk away.

Dachshund puppies sleeping together
Dachshund puppies sleeping together

Questions To Ask A Breeder When Buying A Dachshund Puppy

These are some of the questions to ask the breeder when you’re buying a Dachshund puppy.

  1. How long have you been breeding Dachshunds?
  2. Do you breed other types of dogs?
  3. How many Dachshund litters do you have a year?
  4. What health tests has the Dachshund puppy had?
  5. What vaccinations has the Dachshund puppy had?
  6. What’s the parents’ history?
  7. How have you socialised the Dachshund puppy?
  8. Is the Dachshund puppy covered by pet insurance?
  9. Is the Dachshund puppy microchipped?
  10. What are you feeding the Dachshund puppy?
  11. When can I bring the Dachshund puppy home?

A reputable Dachshund breeder will be open to all your questions and will go out of their way to prove you can trust them. If you get a hint of the breeder being shady or unauthentic, find another breeder.

How long have you been breeding Dachshunds?

This will give you an idea of the breeder’s knowledge and experience. If they’re keen to share their breeding history this is a really good sign.

Do you breed other types of dogs?

It’s OK if a breeder genuinely specialises in several dog breeds, but if they’re breeding multiple commercial breeds without a strong knowledge base of each, this hints they might be doing it for money. If they only breed Dachshunds, that’s a good thing!

How many Dachshund litters do you have a year?

A reputable breeder will only produce one or two litters per year. If they try to swerve this question or give you a much higher number, you know they’re breeding for profit.

What health tests has the Dachshund puppy had?

If you’re getting a miniature Dachshund, you need to be sure both parents are PRA clear (Progressive Retinal Atrophy is an inherited eye disease).

If the miniature puppy is ‘wire-haired’, you also need to check they’ve been tested for Lafora disease (Lafora is an inherited type of epilepsy).

If the breeder looks confused about the health tests and doesn’t seem to know what you’re talking about, it’s best to walk away.

What vaccinations has the Dachshund puppy had?

You need to know what vaccinations, if any, your Dachshund puppy has had and when they had them.

What’s the parents’ history?

The breeder should be able to tell you all about the parent Dachshunds, including their behavioural traits and any health issues they may have had, like IVDD.

How have you socialised the Dachshund puppy?

Puppies that are socialised at a young age adjust better to living in a new home. So ask if the puppy is used to the TV, washing machine, hoover, new people – and so on.

Is the Dachshund puppy covered by pet insurance?

Most breeders will give you a few weeks free pet insurance when you collect the puppy. This gives you time to get home, settle in and organise your own pet insurance.

Don’t wait for the breeder’s insurance to run out before getting your own, as you wont be covered for the first two weeks of a new policy.

Is the Dachshund puppy microchipped?

It’s important to ask about microchipping because it’s a legal requirement in the UK. The ID information contained on the chip will need to be changed over to your details.

What are you feeding the Dachshund puppy?

You need to know what dog food your breeder is currently feeding. You can change the dog food but do it gradually to avoid tummy upsets!

Mix the new food in with his current food in increasing proportions over the course of a week.

When can I bring the Dachshund puppy home?

No responsible breeder would allow you to take the puppy home before 8 weeks of age. So, if the breeder says 6 weeks, this is a red flag to walk away.

You’ll be asked questions by the breeder too

The Dachshunds breeder will ask you questions too. They’ll want to know whether you have any experience of Dachshunds, what arrangements you have in place if you work, whether you have any other dogs or cats, if you have children, whether you have a garden – that sort of thing.

Don’t worry about being asked questions by the breeder, it’s just to ensure the puppy is going to a good home

What Paperwork Do You Get From A Dachshund Breeder?

The paperwork you get from your Dachshund breeder will vary depending on whether the puppy is registered at the Kennel Club or not.

  • A sales contract or receipt (you need this to change the microchip details)
  • Change of Kennel Club Registered Ownership form (so you can transfer ownership in to your name)
  • The pedigree certificate
  • The puppy’s microchip registration
  • Health test certificate copies

Your breeder should also give you information on vaccinations and food, and offer lots of advice on how to care for your Dachshund puppy.

To find out how to care for your new Dachshund puppy click here


So, there you have it! Buying a Dachshund isn’t always straightforward so you’ll need to research your breeder to be sure they’re genuine. Just make sure you Google the breeder, meet them in person, see the puppy with their mother and ask lots of questions. Now you know all the good signs and red flags to look out for, it won’t be long before you find a Dachshund to join your family!

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What To Look Out For When Buying A Dachshund Puppy
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