Can Dachshunds Live with Other Dogs?

A dachshund living with a pug dog and laying on the floor together

Are you thinking of getting a companion for your dachshund? Or maybe you want to get a dachshund but don’t know if he’ll get on with your dogs? We’re here to help you understand if dachshunds can live with other dogs.

Can dachshunds live with other dogs? Yes. With a bit of training, most dachshunds can live with other dogs. But it does depend on the individual dog. Some dachshunds get jealous and territorial and can be suspicious of other dogs.

If you’re umming and ahh’ing about getting a friend for your dachshund or introducing a dachshund into a home with other dogs, read on to find out whether daxies like companions, what breeds they get along with and whether getting a second dog is a good idea.

Do dachshunds like living with other dogs?

Generally, dachshunds can learn to live happily with other dogs, but you do have to take things slow. By nature, dachshunds are very independent and know their own mind, so you can’t just get another dog and expect your dachshund to be instantly ok with it.

Can dachshunds live with other dogs? Dachshund stood happily next to a big dog
Dachshund stood next to another breed of dog

You also need to think about whether it’s the right option for your dachshund. Every dachshund is different – some will love having a new buddy, some will be suspicious for a while and others may get a bit upset or grumpy!

Most dachshunds like having a playmate and will enjoy the stimulation and fun that comes with living with another dog. And they definitely won’t get bored! On the flipside, dachshunds can get very jealous and probably won’t like it if another dog is getting more attention than them. They can also be possessive of their toys and territorial, and they’re generally very suspicious of strangers (dogs and people), so you need to take it slow and make sure you nip any negative behaviours in the bud as early as possible to stop them becoming bad habits.

So, it depends on your dachshund and whether you’re willing to put the hours in. Some will like having a new companion and will just need a bit of help adjusting. Some will need extra training to get used to the idea. And some will never be happy living with another dog – and you shouldn’t force them to.

What breeds get along with dachshunds?

Dachshunds generally prefer living with smaller dogs or other dachshunds, rather than bigger dogs. They’ve been known to do quite well with breeds like boxers, dobermans and various types of terrier. It’s about finding a good match for your dachshund’s temperament.

Can dachshunds live with other dogs? Dachshund sat next to a pug and looking at him
A dachshund checking out a pug dog

It’s not entirely clear if dachshunds recognise their own breed. Probably not – but what they do recognise is the daxie way of doing things. What do we mean by that? Well, most dachshunds have strong personalities, and they get on best with other dogs that share their temperament. So, if your dog is playful and bossy, pair him up with a dog that’s full of beans. If your dachshund is more reserved, try and make sure his new companion is too.

On that point, think about your new dog’s age too. It’s not really fair to introduce a bouncy puppy into a home with an aging dachshund (the dachshund would probably tell the pup to scram!), and vice versa – if you introduce an old dog into a home with a young dachshund, your little daxie still won’t have anyone to play with.

Should I get two dachshunds?

Should I get two dachshunds? Two cute dachshund puppies laying on top of each other
Two cute dachshund puppies laying on top of each other

Your relationship with your dachshunds will be slightly different if you have two. When a dachshund is an ‘only child’, you’re his best buddy. He’s 100% loyal to you and sticks to you like Velcro. With two dachshunds, there’s a tendency for them to team up.

If one of them gets worked up about something, the other one probably will too. And that’s ok as long as you keep reminding them who’s boss (remember, that’s you every single time).

There are so many benefits to getting two dachshunds, including the lovely fact your daxies will never be lonely or bored. But have you ever seen two daxies together? Boy can they bark! If you’re prepared to have a loud house that gets even louder every time the postman comes, then go for it. If not, you might want to think about just getting one (of course, you can always train your dachshund to stop barking so much).

It can be a good idea to get two dachshunds as puppies from the same litter and bring them up together. A brother and sister who know each other and are already bonded would need the least adjustment.

When is the right time to get a second dog?

When is the right time to get a second dog? Dachshund stood happily next to an Alsatian
A dachshund laying down with an alsatian

The right time to get a second dog is:

  • Once you’ve had your dachshund for at least a year
  • When your dachshund is fully trained
  • When you have time to train two dogs
  • When you can afford to have two dogs

This is what you need to know:

Once you’ve had your dachshund for at least a year

This gives your sausage dog time to settle in and get used to his new home, as well as bond with you.

When your dachshund is fully trained

Introducing a new dog before your first daxie is trained makes no sense – all your training will go out the window and it’ll be so much harder to keep him under control.

When you have time to train two dogs

Don’t think your new dog will learn from your dachshund. In reality, your dachshund is more likely to pick up bad habits from the newbie. So you need to make sure you set aside time to socialise and train them in how you expect them both to behave under your roof.

When you can afford to have two dogs

Have you thought about the extra money you’ll spend on food, insurance, vet bills, toys, treats, beds and everything else your dog needs? Having any breed of dog is expensive so you do need to bear this in mind.

When is the right time to get a second dog? Dachshund stood happily next to another breed
A dachshund living with another breed of dog

When is the wrong time to get a second dog?

The wrong time to get a second dog is:

  • When your dachshund is showing signs of anxiety
  • When your dachshund is being aggressive to other dogs
  • When your kids want another dog

This is what you need to know:

When your dachshund is showing signs of anxiety

Getting a second dog will not magically fix your dachshund’s separation anxiety! If anything, you’ll probably end up with two anxious dogs.

When your dachshund is being aggressive to other dogs

There’s no way bringing a strange dog into your home is going to cure your dachshund’s aggression. This is hugely irresponsible and totally unfair to both dogs.

When your kids want another dog

Nope. Dogs aren’t toys. They have to be looked after properly by a responsible adult, which means you have to wait until you’re ready (and have the time and money).

Is my dachshund too old for another dog?

No, it doesn’t really matter how old your dachshund is – it’s more about how long they’ve been the only dog in the house, what their temperament is like and whether the new dog is compatible in terms of personality.

Just take it slow, take the time to introduce the dogs properly and make sure your first dachshund still gets the same amount of attention from you.

Is my dachshund too old for another dog? Three dogs sitting together
Two dachshunds and another breed of dog all living happily together

How do I introduce another dog into our home?

The worst thing you can do is assume your dachshund is going to get on fine with a new dog. You need to introduce them slowly and responsibly:

  • Introduce the dogs outside
  • Get the new dog used to the house
  • Keep both dogs on leads
  • Create separate spaces

Introduce the dogs outside

If you’re bringing a new pup into your home that hasn’t had his jabs yet, start in the garden. Allow the dogs to sniff each other and check each other out before bringing them into your home. If it’s an older dog that’s had all his jabs, take them out for a walk together before you introduce them to the home.

Can dachshunds live with other dogs? Two dachshunds out for a walk together
A dachshund and a west highland terrier out for a walk together

Get the new dog used to the house

Ask someone to take your other dog out for a walk. Let the new dog get used to the house on his own first – take him round on a lead and let him sniff everything.

Keep both dogs on leads

Introduce the two dogs on leads, keeping them separate at first and then letting them get closer. If they sniff nicely, reward them. If they show signs of aggression, separate them calmly and try again later.

Create separate spaces

Once they’re settled around each other, put the new dog in a separate space that you’ve closed off with baby gates (or pop him in his crate). Separate the dogs like this for a few days, so they’re eating and sleeping away from each other too. Then open the gates but let them decide when they’re ready to interact. Again, watch for aggressive behaviour and separate them as needed.


So, now you know what to consider when thinking about getting a second dog, it’s over to you to decide whether it’s right for your dachshund. If you think your little sausage dog will love having a playmate, give it a try: just take his training slow and be sensible. If your dachshund is a bit anxious and your gut is telling you he may not like having another dog around, it’s probably best not to. After all, you know your dachshund better than anyone.

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